What’s better than Porsche’s and racing? BRUNCH!!

Folks, I am hoping to see many of you at this event at the Saratoga Auto Museum on Sunday the 28th. There is still space available.

There will be great food, your friends (old and new), and I hear there are going to be some really nice door prizes.

Here is the link to sign up for the event, and root for a PORSCHE victory! 🙂
https://saratogaauto.z2systems.com/np/clients/saratogaauto/eventRegistrati on.jsp?event=602

Our first event of the year will be Sunday Brunch at the finish line of the 56th running of the Rolex 24 at Daytona. 

THE BEST IN MOTORSPORTS CONVERGE ON DAYTONA FOR NORTH AMERICA’S PREMIER ENDURANCE RACE

Since 1962, racing legends that span the motorsports universe have come to compete in DAYTONA’s endurance sports car classic. From sunrise to sunset to sunrise again, witness as both man and machine are pushed to the limit in this twice-around-the-clock marathon. 

Join us for fabulous entertainment, non-stop racing and food from the area’s finest caterer, “the Mazzone’s”!  Enjoy the ultimate hospitality experience featuring a delicious blend of food and fast cars at the Saratoga Automobile Museum. (SAM)

The Saratoga Auto Museum has graciously partnered with us to create an unforgettable experience like only Saratogians can. T hey will be streaming a live feed of the 56th running of the Rolex 24 at Daytona, also displaying a previous race car that competed in the Rolex 24 with many other surprises.   i.e. the slot car and driving simulator challenge

 

 

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My First Porsche: Monk Schane-Lydon

On my wall in my office is a list of cars. There are 36 cars so far and 10 motorcycles. That list includes a few VW’s, some British sports cars, a couple of Isuzu Troopers, several Hondas, and at least one vintage Land Rover.

You see, I bought cars cheap, ran them for a little while and sold them again. There are some I miss, such as the Vanagon Syncro or the Jeep Commando, or maybe even my old ’59 Coupe DeVille. But I had always told myself, that someday I’ll get a Porsche. To me it was my holy grail, a car that I will have when I’m ready.

To be honest, I don’t know what kept me from getting one earlier. The reality is, they’re not that expensive. Why buy a Subaru when you can have a used Porsche?

When I started looking, I started with research. The 911 is iconic and I love the lines on the older models, before they started flaring the fenders and going all disco. I know the stories of how they handle. One wrong move in a fast corner and the back end would be chasing trees in the woods, evidently hunting for rabbits or some such thing. I used to drive a tail heavy car, if you count my old VW’s. I could drift my old Super Beetle through an exit ramp off the highway with the best of them. You could dial in the drift with the throttle. But then came the Boxster. The rebirth of the 550 Spyder in my eyes. Mid engine, convertible, and according to the reviews, damn nimble and perhaps even better than a 911.

The Boxster was balanced. Not tail heavy.

More research! There’s a scare about the intermediate shaft bearing, and that has dropped the prices on pre 2009 models. The 2009 however has a different engine design, the 9A1, and also incorporated a lot of the changes that previous owners were looking for.

So the hunt was on!

A 2009 Boxster. I found mine in New Hampshire at some random used car dealership thanks to Cars.com. I drove my TDI Beetle north of Boston, traded it in and drove the Porsche home. Dark blue metallic with the navy blue soft top. It’s not the S model, but that doesn’t matter presently, (ask me again in a couple years.) It gets out of its way quite nicely and can point and shoot in traffic. When I drive out to Buffalo or down to Charlotte, it’s perfectly comfortable and I enjoy every second of it. Top down or up? If it’s above 13 degrees Celsius, (I went metric 5 years ago) then the top is down, till the rain gets too intense.

 

So the biggest question I have, is, “Why did I wait so long?”

 

I’m Monk Schane-Lydon, the new Webmaster/Communications Chair, so this will give you some insight to my Porsche experience. One car so far! Until I find that 912 of my dreams. monk@monksvoice.com Send me any stories and pictures for the blog!

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Why I Bought My First Porsche: David Cathers

Let me admit this right away. I drive a 1983 911 SC cabriolet, and it’s the only Porsche 

I’ve ever owned. As PCA’s e-Brake News said recently, this model is a forgotten car, one that many Porsche-philes consider little more than a “structurally compromised fashion statement.” A more recent e-Brake News called it the least-favored 911 body style of the era. So, if you’d rather skip over to someone else’s blog post and read about a more interesting set of wheels, I won’t blame you a bit.

I bought this car new, and at that time it had been about twenty years since I’d 

had something fun to drive. When I was in college in the early 1960s I had a 1958 MGA; I loved that car and I still miss it. But one of my classmates owned a Speedster, probably the first Porsche I ever saw in person. Occasionally it cruised by me on campus, and I would feel an overwhelming pang of desire.

By the early 1980s, after two decades of settling for Beetles and Civics, I could afford something more interesting, but by then I didn’t know how to go about it. I don’t think anyone bought or sold cars on the internet then, I didn’t know anyone who owned a sports car, and I hadn’t even heard of Hemmings Motor News. I almost certainly would have bought an MGA if I could have figured out how to find one.

Instead, I looked first at a car that you still saw on the road in those days – the 190 SL, to my eye one of the most beautiful Mercedes ever built. I drove maybe three of them and was amazed at how stodgy they were; probably they’re not all so dull, but the ones I tried were. However, this initial foray lead to one thrilling experience: the last 190SL I looked at was in the “pre-owned” inventory of a Mercedes dealer, and in the showroom it was parked next to a stunning 300SL roadster. To be nice the salesman let me sit in its driver’s seat, and just holding that steering wheel was electrifying, even though the sales guy and I both knew there was no way I could come up with its $63,000 price tag. (You know what that model can bring today.)

Then a friend of a friend told me his grandfather was the original owner of a 1952 Jaguar XK120 fixed head coupe that he wanted to sell, and since I was car hunting he wondered if I’d like to see it. Yes, I would. I drove it twice, and although it was so stately that it’s hard to believe this elegant driver could ever have been considered a sports car, I loved the way it went snick, snick, snick up through the gears, and I said yes, I want this car. Granddad and I agreed on price. But a few days later, for his own private reasons, he changed his mind, the car was no longer for sale, and I was out of luck.

Then, finally, my long-ago college memory of that Speedster came back to me, and the word “Porsche” flashed in my mind. I went to a dealer and drove a new 911. This was instant love, like nothing I had ever driven before: powerful, fast, great handling, amazing brakes — and it was beautiful. Last year I told my son that I was now too old to drive this car and said I was giving it to him; he said, thanks Dad, not yet, I’m too busy, you keep it a while longer. He’ll get it eventually, but for now I’m so glad it’s still mine.

 

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at monk@monksvoice.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Sean McCullough

Sean McCullough

Number of Porsches owned:  2

Current car:   1964 356C

Although I was asked to write about “my first Porsche”, our current 356C is actually my 2nd Porsche.  I owned a 1960 Super 90 in 1966, but sold it when I went off to school (But here’s a better story behind #2).

After graduating in 1972, I worked for GE in the Cape Canaveral area. On a hot early evening, while crossing Merritt Island, I pulled up next to a metallic blue 356C at a stop light.  I rolled down the window of my air-conditioned company car and asked the woman if she knew anyone that had a 356 that they would like to sell (her windows were open since 356 Porsches did not come with AC).  She was appeared quite warm and moist with a visible drop of perspiration on her cheek and said loudly, “meet me at the next parking lot”.

When she got out of the Porsche I could see she was pregnant and had a small child with her in the car.  Since their family was apparently outgrowing the Porsche (the back seats were a mere suggestion, large enough for a dog) and the interior was very worn – we settled on a purchase price of $1,100.

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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There’s a story behind the plate

By Gary Richards —

“You’re so vain…” The voice of Carly Simon in my head.  “Give me a break,” I shot back.  “I don’t post pictures of my breakfast on Facebook and the only tweeting around our house comes from the birds in our yard.”  Yet, there I was, standing in line at the DMV ordering one of those plates with messages only Navajo Code Talkers can read.

“You’re so vain…”, the Greek chorus chanted in my head.  Figures, the Greeks had this thing with self-absorption.  Think Narcissus.  You know — the guy who dies standing by a pool — in love with his own reflection.  But, tough beans; I wasn’t going to let some 60’s folk diva or a bunch of guys in togas stop me.  So, I plunked down my sixty bucks and ordered our “vanity” plate (I know I’m not alone).

No surprise these plates are proliferating; we live in a selfie stick world.  Some are pretentious — the smirking young guy sitting at a traffic light in a new Beemer with a plate reading DOW 2000.  That had to be one of the first salvos in the plate war.  With the market topping $23K, no need to think about how long ago that was. Now, years later, vanity plates seem to be sprouting like dandelions in our lawn.   

Here’s a favorite sampling from the internet: 

Have zombies in the family?  Consider this one below…

Got that VW Beetle thing going? EWWABUG
Putting around in a Bugatti Chiron?  LOWMPG 
How about RUBIX on a Nissan Cube?
Perhaps GANDALF for drivers who don’t let people pass?
IMACAR… Duh…
The perfect plate for hermits and misanthropes: IH8UALL
Is there an Infinity in your driveway? NBEYOND

GOT2PEE — Hey five hours without stopping is a long time in a car.
EXCUZEME — Seems like the perfect plate for bad but polite drivers.
And finally, UARNEXT… on a hearse.  I’m not amused.

So, back to DMV and the plate that set us back a half-dozen ten spots.  Here it is; kinda cryptic.  Not really all that funny; it wasn’t meant to be.  New York no longer calls these vanity plates;  they’re “personalized license plates”. That’s OK with me; it’s not just calling a pig by a different name (I happen to like pigs, by the way).  It’s just that some people really do have a story to tell.  We do… so I will share ours.

My mom knew I loved Porsches.  I guess my head swiveling every time one passed while I was driving her to wherever gave it away.  Mom was a very giving person.  She would have loved to put a Porsche in our driveway; but, she hung by a very thin financial thread.  Even so, she always found a few bucks each week to play her lottery numbers.

 “If I win, I’ll buy you a Porsche,” she said.  She never won and she never saw the Porsche my wife and I are fortunate enough to be driving.  If she saw me drive up in it, I know there’d be a smile on her face.  So, no vanity in our plate.  Just a thank you to (and a memory of) my mom.  You see, those are her initials… VER…. and that’s her birthday… 10-30.

 

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Fire Extinguisher Recall

By Mike Tucker —

A few years ago, I had a minor fire when checking the spark on a Husqvarna dirt bike and it burst into flames. The first fire extinguisher I tried did not work; despite being nearly new.  The second one I used (a racing one) worked and the Husky was saved, although it looked a little barbecued. 

That defective extinguisher was made by Kidde; so when I heard about a Kidde recall I checked what I had now. Kidde is the major fire extinguisher manufacturer who sells under their own brand and literally dozens of other brands.  They are presently recalling and replacing all of their plastic nozzle and handle extinguishers. The ones we buy for the track have metal parts and are OK, however checking the ones in my shop I found two that fell under the recall. One of my buddies checked his, as well, and had four more to be recalled. 

The good news is when I called Kidde, they answered on the first ring and are sending replacements free of charge within the next two weeks.  I simply had to provide them with the model and serial number.  The Kidde website (www.kidde.com) has details on the recall.   

 

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Mouse Hunting Tips

By Mike Tucker —

Mice love to chew.   In fact, if they don’t, their teeth will grow too long and they will starve. Mice damage is the number one non-warranty issue for the RV Industry and most car manufacturers. A friend had his camping trailer burn up this summer due to an electrical short created by a mouse and last year a 911 ragtop owner paid over $12,000 for repairs to his electrical system due to mice. Are you now paranoid enough to take the steps to prevent damage from mice?

Newer cars are at much higher risk because the wire industry has been changing to more environmentally friendly soy-based insulation. Germany has very aggressive environmental laws, which is why our Porsche’s are at risk.  Not to mention, the flat 6 and 4 engines make great nesting places. 

In Upstate New York exterminators like to say there are two types of people… those who know they have mice… and those who don’t know.    

Mouse damage to homes, automobiles, and equipment is a major problem. Mice also bring diseases into homes and there is research that are the major transporter of Deer ticks which carry lyme disease. They create the top non-warranty expenses for RVs and automobiles.  They damage homes, food crops and have even cause home fires by chewing live electrical wires. They have flexible bone structures and can squeeze under doors and through very small holes. If the space is enough for a pinky finger a mouse can get through it. Wire mesh is a great way to fill holes around pipes and electrical entry points.

There is a lot of information about stopping mice from companies selling traps, poisons and other tools. While this information is useful, independent research and information from professional exterminators is usually more accurate.  Having read everything available and testing a lot of the techniques and equipment has resulted in some tips I am happy to share. These are some of the highlights:

Most people will tell me they don’t have mice because they don’t see mouse turds, this is an error because if you see turds you have a lot of mice. If you see no evidence in the Northeast you still have mice, you just don’t know it.

The good news is mice spend their entire lives within a 50-70 foot area and do not migrate. They live within this area all their life unless relocated by a bird of prey or human. This means if you get rid of all of them you should be rid of them forever. Of course, I will caution that that is next to impossible, so it’s better to keep up the fight to be sure.   

Best trap — Victor wood spring trap with the plastic cheese pad. Inexpensive, available at hardware stores and can be reused many times. This trap can be tricky to set because they are very sensitive. More conventional spring wire traps can work also, but mice can sometimes rob the bait so one trick is to tie peanut butter smeared yarn in the bait area so the mouse will chew and pull the trap trigger.

Electronic mouse traps – I have tried several brands and types and they do not work well.  Electronic radio transmitters which are supposed to drive mice away, do not work. I have caught mice under them.

Mouse Magic pads – Available at feed and ag stores, the ingredients indicate they utilize peppermint and spearmint scents to keep mice away. The paper pads appear to work, but are expensive and only last 30 days. A much less expensive alternative is to make your own with cotton balls and buying essence of peppermint and spearmint from a health food store. Place 1-3 drops on a cotton ball and place them around areas where you do not want mice. Change or recharge them every 30 days. This works well, but the odor is strong so not good for areas where you live or enclosed spaces, better for garages, barns, sheds, etc. Wear plastic or rubber gloves or you will smell like the scent for a long time.

Poisons – Most of the stuff available from hardware stores is ineffective. Professionals use more powerful poisons and often more than one type in the same bait station. This is because mice do not eat meals, they snack and go and forth to the food supply many times. If they start to feel sick they quit eating whatever made them feel bad. This is why poisons sometimes are eaten and then are not touched giving the impression they worked and killed all the mice when they are just ignoring it.  Pro poisons are available over the internet, but you must buy a large quantity so need to team up or stock up. The highest rated brand is “Final” by Bell labs which Pros rate 5 out of 5. Bait stations are needed if the poison will be used in areas where other animals will be around. In areas where there is no concern for other animals, you can place it in the open. Research has concluded animals that eat mice do not die from eating mice that have been poisoned. They can die from eating the poison directly so I always use bait stations designed for mice. The major issue with poison is if mice eat and die in your walls or other places where you cannot get to them. This happens frequently so I don’t recommend poisons if you hear mice in your walls or attic until their access has been solved.    

Cats – Cats can do a good job (or a poor job) depending on their inclination.  They also can catch, play and release them, so a cat does not always work. When they sleep the mice do their thing.

Location of traps and bait stations – Mice run along walls and corners, they leave a scent for other mice to follow so even if you get a few, more are likely to follow. Snakes also like to follow the scent to try and get the mice, so if you find snakes in your building you have mice in your building. They prefer to be under cover so my most effective trap locations have been along walls with a board covering the trap leaving room for the trap to work under the cover. Peanut butter and mouse attractants work better than cheese which dries out quickly. Mice like fresh bait so you need to change it every 1-2 weeks depending on the environment.  Traps should be set in pairs so that if the mouse is working on getting the bait without setting off the trap the backup trap will catch them if they step on it.

Food inspectors require that facilities processing food set traps and bait outside. I do this at my house and garage and it’s made a huge difference. Since doing this I have caught one mouse in my garage, whereas before it was 6-8 per year. The issues outside have been that the wood traps corrode faster and the traps and bait stations can be stolen by larger animals. I had to start attaching the bait stations to wood blocks to keep them in place.    

Mice population control takes hard work and diligence. Always handle dead ones them with gloves and wash afterward. Clean areas where they have been and keep poisons away from kids, other pets and animals you don’t want to harm.

Photo:  Mouse nest in 944 Turbo airbox with no wiring damage.

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Club Hosts Annual Dinner

It was a great night to recap the year for the Hudson Champlain Region of PCA.  Fun, food and charity were highlights of the evening’s agenda at Mallozzi’s Clubhouse at Western Turnpike Golf Course.  Outgoing President Jim Morgan, along with various committee chairs, took members through the year’s various activities — from Driver’s Education, Track Events and Autocross to Drive & Dines and overnight getaways, there was a full slate in which HCP club members participated during the year.  Outgoing Treasurer, Will Waldron also walked attendees through the year’s finances.

This annual event also provides an opportunity to thank our various sponsors throughout the year, many of which host our monthly meetings or support various club endeavors.  Additionally, thanks to the many donations by club members, the silent auction raised funds for the American Cancer Society.

And perhaps, most importantly, Jim introduced the incoming elected club officers:

President – Chris Klapper

Vice President – Lydia Marlow

Secretary – John Pellerin

Treasurer – Audrey Englesberg

Past-President – Jim Morgan

Don’t forget, the annual Holiday Party is set for Saturday, December 2nd, at the home of Ken & Karen Blass, 357 Pitts Road, in Old Chatham.  If you plan to attend, please bring an unwrapped toy for a child, as we will be providing them on behalf of the club to Toys For Tots. 

 

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Chris Klapper

Chris Klapper

Number of Porsches owned:  3

Current cars:  2006 Basalt Black Cayman S and 1986 Guards Red 944

Having always been a Lotus fan, I attained my dream car, a 1994 Lotus Esprit S4.  As marvelous as the car is, it is not a car one can take to our child’s school for concerts, sporting events, etc…

So, the search was on for an everyday driver sports car. The answer, of course, was the Porsche 996. And what an answer it was!  A beautiful 2001 Orient Red with Cinnamon interior.  We drove the car pretty much year-round for 9 years. We learned to Autocross and drive on the track with it, as well.  And every time we drove it somewhere, it just felt and sounded marvelous. That car converted us to the “dark side”… and Linda and I are glad it did!

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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Hudson Champlain hosts first Zone 1 Weekend

By Chris Klapper —

The Hudson Champlain Region recently hosted the first PCA Zone 1 Weekend Getaway, September 29-October 1.  WOW, our region did us proud!

Activities began that Friday afternoon at the Gideon Putnam Hotel with George Earle, Donna Hughes, Joshua Klapper, Linda Klapper and Peter Ulfik assisting to get the weekenders parked, registered and ready for the weekend. That evening the group both toured and dined at the Saratoga Auto Museum.  To be the first group to see the new exhibit “Wheels at Work”, proved to be an awesome experience to share with Zone 1 visitors; highlighted by a great moment when the group celebrated the evening with Chuck and Joyce Gladle, marking their 55th wedding anniversary.

After a hearty Saturday breakfast, the group gathered, and a train of 45 Porsches headed out to drive the east side of Lake George with the destination of Fort Ticonderoga ahead.  A little chill and rain was in the air but did not dull the excitement of the drive of a huge caravan. The mid-point stop on our trip was in the town of Fort Ann.  Upon learning we would be stopping in town, the community offered to open their fire station for our use that morning.  By the time the group reached Ticonderoga, the rain had ceased and participants were able to explore the rich history Fort Ticonderoga provides.  On the return trip, it was quite a site to see the Northway rest stop just below Exit 17, stacked with Porches 4 to 5 in a row.  It was amazing an area that seemed deserted all of a sudden have people come out of nowhere to take pictures of the beautiful array of cars.

Thank you to Louis Dahoda, Tatyana Darrius, Matt Rutten, Audrey Engelsberg, Mike and Pam Bryan; Chuck and Joyce Gladle, Kurt Drottar, Laura Bakalyar, Andy Dorman, Amanda Brinke, John Pelerin, Allan Schwartz, and Linda Klapper for being the awesome lead/follow team that kept things together and moving during the day’s event.

Sunday morning the group again gathered and traveled north to the beautiful Sagamore to enjoy a fabulous lunch overlooking the lake, mountains and stunning hotel grounds.  Once again, the Hudson Champlain volunteers made sure the trip up to the Sagamore came off without a hitch. Thank you, Louis Dahoda, Tatyana Darrius, Mike and Pam Bryan, Chuck and Joyce Gladle, Kurt Drottar, Laura Bakalyar, Aaron and Amelia Ambrosino, and Linda Klapper.

Stories of the weekend and budding friendships filled the air as the weekend gathering came to a close. The overwhelming consensus was that the weekend was a great success and those in attendance can’t wait for next year’s event.

The Gauntlet has been thrown by the Hudson Champlain Region and the standard for hosting a Zone getaway has been set. The incredible number of compliments to the region by attendees was overwhelming.  I wish luck to the next region in which the Zone 1 Weekend Getaway is hosted. They will have large expectations to live up too.  A fantastic job by every volunteer!  Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

(Photos courtesy of Chris & Linda Klapper)

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Camp4 Canada: Winter driving experience

In case you didn’t read about this in the eBrake newsletter, here’s a link to driving experience events happening this winter in Quebec, for those who’d like to know what it feels like to drive a Porsche in winter conditions.

http://porschedrivingexperiencecanada.ca/en/about/

Price are quoted in Canadian dollars, which is presently at about 80 cents against the US Dollar.  

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Board of Director Nominees

If you’ve not already received a letter from our nomination committee, please be looking out for it in your physical mailbox, as it’s time to vote for our board of directors.  This is done via formal mail (aka “snail mail”) to comply with PCA mandates.  We ask that you return your ballot (via snail mail) to the attention of nominee committee member Mike Tucker.  With your ballot, there is an addressed return envelope to Mike’s address.

In the meantime, our nominees have provided biographical details about themselves and their participation in our club:

President – Chris Klapper

Born and raised in Schenectady NY I am a lifetime resident of the area. I attended college at Schenectady County Community College and Valparaiso University. I am presently employed by General Electric, as a Materials Technician specializing in alloy development and magnetic properties of materials.
I have always been in love with sports and speed having played Basketball Baseball Tennis in high school, and Baseball, Soccer and Tennis in college. My biggest sports thrill to date is being involved with United States Bobsled Team from 1985-1987 and participating in the 1986 World Cup 4 man competition (ask me about it sometime!).

My family, Linda and my 3 children are the joys of my life. I enjoy music, artwork and traveling when possible
I have been actively involved with HCP-PCA for over 7 years. On the regional level:

·         planning routes and leading drives,  stepping in on short notice to lead drive & dine events 
·         participating and helping with autocross events, 
·         attending HCP and other regions DE events at multiple tracks, locations
·         2013-15:  HCP Autocross Chair expanded the program and increased  number of  events each year and grew

HCP members  participation

·         2015-17:Vice President HCP Region
·         2015: Became licensed to race in PCA Club Racing
·         2016: Started working with Tire Rack’s Street Survival course for teenage drivers with other regions/clubs
·         2016 Attained National certified instructor status with PCA

I have worked on the Zone 1 level in many ways:

  • 2011-13: tech support for the Scrutineers PCA Zone1 Clash at theGlen
  • 2014-15: Fixed operations assistant at the Zone 1 “Clash at the Glen”
  • 2015 on: Participating in PCA club racing (what a blast!) currently running in SP1
  • 2015: Attended zone 1 concourse
  • 2015-16: Lead volunteers at PCA Zone 1 48hrs at the Glen
  • 2016: lead volunteer coordinator Zone 1 “Clash at the Glen
  • 2017: Put together Initial Zone 1 Weekend Getaway 3day event

I believe my board exposure to the many facets of PCA membership serves me well in understanding the many varied interests of PCA members. I understand there is a balance to be struck and fine lines to be walked to keep such a varied number of interests happy. I understand that the health and growth of the Hudson Champlain Region are the main responsibilities of the President.  Also the wellbeing and growth of, PCA and Zone 1. That by effectively working with Hudson Champlain’s membership as well as national and regional staff the goal of growing and strengthening the club can be achieved.

Vice President – Lydia Marlow

This is a short synopsis of latest accomplishments and positions of responsibility I held in recent years, which will serve as background consideration as to my qualifications for the position of Vice President of the Hudson Champlain Porsche Club.  I have been an extremely active and diversified club member since my husband Stephen and I joined HCPC.  I served as Activities Committee Chair with my husband for two years (planning all club trips and activities), and have been a very active club member.  I also served as Secretary for HCP the past four years.  During my membership, I have attended over 95% of all monthly meetings, helped to plan & help carry out club activities in a volunteer capacity, and participated in almost the majority of all monthly day trips held.  I was involved in helping build the over-night 3-day weekend trips program and have attended all but one since they were created.  I am co-owner of two Porsches (1986 930 Wide Body Turbo and 2104 Cayman S).   My career has been exclusively as a pharmacist, in both military and civilian capacities.  My current civilian position is as a Pharmacist for Express Scripts.  My last military position held was as a Pharmacist (grade Major).  I was responsible for coordinating efforts of pharmacy operations at clinic and hospital levels.  I also served in additional duty capacity as USAF Academy Liaison Officer for over 15 years.  During that period I was the Upstate NY Area Deputy Commander over six years and Area Commander four years (geographic area covering 57 counties w/ over 950 schools & 60 plus officers working for me to support USAFA recruiting effort).  Current Status: Retired USAF (after 21 years of reserve service).  I recently retired from my position as an Independent Consultant to the NYS Office of Developmental Services. 

Having been a member of the club over 12 years, I have seen many good people take this club to newer and greater heights each year.   During my membership with the club, I have seen there are three groups develop within the club; those who track, the socials, and those who participate in both.  The happiness of all are equally important in sustaining that outstanding quality of life we have experienced in the past to keep satisfying our current members, and the need to continue to offer to bring in new members.  From those groups we have had many volunteers, who help make these areas shine; I have always been a social type volunteer (although my one track experience was a GREAT one, and I would enjoy another shot at that venue) and would be a strong advocate for those folks who enjoy that side of the house (we have a strong group that already who mentors and pushes for quality track events).   Both of my two boys are now grown and on their own, and having enjoyed my positions with HCP, I would like to continue to take active role in helping to make our club stay the best chapter in PCA; I believe hard work will keep it there.  Being in a support role as VP, I feel would allow me the opportunity to serve and help sustain the efforts of those who did so much, so well before us.  It is our club and we need to work to keep it the kind of club that keeps enticing others to join and current member to stay.  I have reached that time in my life I have more time available to contribute, that I can be of further use to the club and its membership, and position of VP is the channel I am seeking to help carry those ideas out.  I would be most honored to serve and would perform those duties in a positive manner to those other members of this great club. I appreciate your time and support.

Treasurer – Audrey Englesberg

I have been a member HCP member since 2012. I am active in DE, Autocross and am one of Autocross minions in charge of donuts, liability forms and being the Observer for those events. Apart from balancing the checkbook using Quicken;  underwriting Porsche acquisitions by astute analysis of the stock market; and working as a senior manager negotiating complex technology agreements at Globalfoundries which also includes business case analysis, I have the skills to manage the books and provide a balanced view to keep our club financially healthy.

Secretary – John Pellerin
 
My name is John Pellerin and I have been a member of the Hudson Champlain region since 2011 after moving to Saratoga Springs in June 2010 and getting my first Porsche.  Since that time, I am now on my third Porsche and enjoy and appreciate all that our club has to offer.  Throughout this time, I have had the opportunity to participate in and volunteer for several of the clubs activities including Autocross, DEs, and Zone 1 events.  These opportunities have motivated me to seek further ways in which I can serve our club and I seek your support as club Secretary.  I look forward to this opportunity to work with fellow officers and members of the HCP region to continue to offer and develop more great experiences for all club members.
 

 

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October D&D: die Fahrt zum Oktoberfest

By Bryan Hollenbaugh —

What a great way to wrap up this season’s Drive & Dines, with a leaf-peeping excursion into the Catskill Mountains, where the Hunter Mountain Ski Resort was hosting it’s annual Oktoberfest!  Plenty of Fall colors to enjoy surpassed only by some of the best-designed roads for Porsches southern Albany County and Greene County have to offer.

Louis Dahoda led the entourage, which featured a season-high 20 cars participating in the drive.  From the sweep position, it’s fun to see a long line of great cars weaving their way through the mountain roads.  And, for the people who live in these bucolic areas, there’s perhaps nothing that will make you stop dead in your tracks as seeing a collection of Porsche automobiles pass by.  Louis also became the inspiration for a newly-coined phrase when referencing U-turns.  It only seems fitting, when encountering more than one U-turn in a given run, the plural form is now affectionately referred to as a “Lou-turn”.  

All kidding aside, this was one of the most enjoyable destinations of the year.  Oktoberfest was in full swing as the group was waved into our prime parking spaces at the resort.  German food, cold beverages, lederhosen, no shortage of people wearing Bavarian hats, and live polka music made for a great afternoon spent with club members.  And among all the stimulation there was also the Das Laufwerk Euro Car Rally, featuring Audis, VWs and perhaps a few Beemers (Although one of the Audi owners was grumbling as we entered the complex, that he thought the Porsche day was the prior weekend.  That, of course, made me smile, as I think our HCP group garnered the attention and praise of festival patrons.).

Great job and many thanks to Louis for selecting this destination; arranging for parking and, most importantly, getting us there (not to mention, providing comic relief!) and rounding out what has been a great season of Drive & Dine events for the club!

(Photos courtesy of Jenny Reinhorn and Joyce & Bryan Hollenbaugh)

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HCP Weekend Getaway: Enjoying the slow of Stowe

By Bryan Hollenbaugh –

You could not have asked for more perfect weather for a HCP weekend getaway!   While Vermont has yet to feel the crisp Fall air or witness the exuberance of color from its seemingly endless supply of various Maple, Birch, Oak, Sycamore and Ash trees, no one — neither local or tourist — was complaining about the extended Summer temps.  Soon enough, the temperature will drop; leaves will rapidly turn color and fall from the trees… and Vermonters will turn their focus to the impending winter ski season.  But one thing is for certain no one in Vermont is (or was) in a rush, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing!  And, when in Stowe, you’re encouraged to slow it down and take it in; the quaint little town, nestled between Mount Hunger and Mount Mansfield, has something for everyone… active or otherwise.

As scenic drives go, perhaps Vermont Route 100 is the crown jewel of the Green Mountain State.  This road meanders its way from the bottom to the top of the state, through its mountainous center.  After an initial start from Malta, trip organizer Matt Rutten had our group pick up Route 100 at Killington and led the trek northward to the Commodore’s Inn, in Stowe.   A keyword of advice, patience is required at all times when traveling along VT-100, as there are no shoulders, very limited passing opportunities, and you can expect a varied collection of vehicles on the road; ranging from trucks and tractors to the occasional blue-haired Vermonter ensuring everyone in the line behind them travels well below the posted speed limit.  However, the trek certainly gives you an opportunity to enjoy the little hamlets that dot along the route, as well as the flora and fauna that abounds in Vermont and does not disappoint.

The Friday evening group dinner at Commodore’s Inn brought on the typical camaraderie of prior annual HCP weekend getaways, with participants enjoying a meal while sharing stories and laughs of what brought them to the group.

On Saturday, members went off on various jaunts; some electing to hike Smuggler’s Notch State Park, while others hit the Ben & Jerry’s Factory tour in nearby Waterbury, and another group enjoyed the Gondola ride to the top of Mount Mansfield, followed by a visit to the Boyden Winery and Idletyme Brewery. 

The group reconnected Saturday evening for dinner at the von Trapp Bierhall, part of the 2500-acre von Trapp Estate and just down the road from the renowned von Trapp Lodge, perched above Stowe.  The von Trapp family, of course, has been immortalized as the focus of the Broadway musical (and later motion picture) “The Sound of Music”, inspired by matriarch Maria von Trapp’s stories of the Trapp Family Singers.  Her son Johannes, along with his adult children, manage the estate, which has since expanded to include the award-winning  von Trapp Brewery and associated Bierhall.

A special thank you to Matt Rutten and Audrey Englesberg for planning and coordinating the trip.  It was a great success!

(Photos by Amanda Brinke, Joyce & Bryan Hollenbaugh)

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September Autocross puts drivers on fast track

HCP Autocross chair Matt Rutten reports the setup team built a fast course in the McCarty Avenue parking lot this past Sunday, in Albany.  The course challenged the 22 drivers (among them 4 first timers) to maximize speed in fast slaloms while maintaining control in the turns.

With perfect weather, the morning session allowed drivers to learn the course while determining their best line.  By the afternoon, the course was fast and smooth, with all drivers improving their course times.

A special thank you to all who helped set up and run the course throughout the day.

The next Autocross will be Sunday, October 8th, at Saratoga Spa State Park.  For more information, contact Matt Rutten at hcpautocross@gmail.com.

Photos provided by Adam Wright and Matt Rutten.

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HCP Club Member Adam Wright Featured (Again) By PCA

In case you haven’t had the opportunity to read the latest PCA eBrake, it features an article penned by HCP club member Adam Wright.  It’s the second article in recent months PCA has featured from Adam, and this one is equally as entertaining and informative.  Adam is the owner of Unobtanium and has made his mark scouring for Porsches in need of more than just a little TLC.  Enjoy his latest work via the link below…

https://www.pca.org/news/2017-08-29/barnfinding-pick-well

 

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Poll: Your Favorite Porsche Model

Poll – Your favorite Porsche model?

 

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August D&D: Road trip to RPM

By Bryan Hollenbaugh —

A fantastic August day for a PCA Drive & Dine to Vergennes, Vermont!  Mother Nature seemed to be at peace with the perfect mixture of sun, breeze, and countryside as 18 cars participated in a road trip along the Hudson River and over the Champlain Bridge to visit Restoration & Performance Motorcars (www.rpmvt.com). 

As one might imagine in relatively nonchalant Vermont, there’s no signage as you approach RPM, just a robust looking barn which already had an immaculate collection of Porsches sitting in front as our entourage made our way to park (No doubt strategically placed to capture our attention!).

The brainchild of Peter Markowski, RPM is a collection of many priceless classics, along with several eclectic cars in various degrees of restoration and repair.  Peter’s son Steve was on hand to open the shop and allow the group to freely roam through the impressive collection of mostly Ferrari and Porsche models.  One-part restoration; one-part repair, and one-part retail, Steve was quick to share that selling cars is the profitable part of the business; although one might expect those who seek out RPM’s talents from across the Northeast are investing in their expertise and creativity to bring their performance cars back to life.  And, as for the cars the Markowski’s purchase and invest heavily in restoring; there might also be a little labor of love that goes into it.  It’s typically impressive when you see one pristine Ferrari Dino in a barn, but to see several in one collection is nothing short of inspiring.

After enjoying a tour of RPM, the group set its sights on a little gem in downtown Vergennes, the Hired Hand Brewing Company (www.hiredhandbrewing.com).   Great food and just enough space to handle our group, it’s just a block off the main drag of downtown Vergennes.  Among the group who made the trek were a few new members of the club, along with several club members who were able to enjoy their first D&D of the year.

Interesting enough, Vergennes is the smallest of Vermont’s nine cities (seriously, only 9 cities in the entire state!).  Its population (just north of 2,000) has been relatively the same since the 1970’s, yet it’s downtown is hustling and bustling with cafes and shops.  By all accounts, it appears to be a thriving Vermont “city.”  And, at just over two hours from the Capital Region, it’s certainly worthy of a day trip to explore the area.  Additionally, nearby Addison boasts Vermont’s largest concentration of covered bridges, for those who like to seek out landmarks.

(Photos by Stephen Pivonka, Kathy Michalek and Bryan Hollenbaugh)

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Covered bridges and a brewery

By Bryan Hollenbaugh —

This past Sunday, I decided I wanted to accomplish three things… 1) Go for a lengthy drive;  2) Enjoy lunch at a relaxing, no rush place at a scenic location; and 3) Track down several covered bridges in our area along the way. 

I’ve always been enamored with wooden covered bridges; most lasting decades beyond their uncovered counterparts.  I suspect these bridges were designed not only to protect the timber from the harsh elements of winter but to provide a safer passage for horses and pedestrians crossing; as many pre-date the mass popularity of the automobile.  As there are few in Upstate New York, and Vermont might have perhaps the largest density of them of any state (110 covered bridges within the state), I figured I could at least encounter a handful on a quick run through the countryside northeast of Albany.

So I convinced a friend to roll out his sports car and follow me on my quest.   We took off heading north toward Mechanicville, crossing the Hudson River and heading east on Route 67, which is a scenic stretch of rolling hills and sweeping curves that run along the Hoosic River (spelled differently from the similarly pronounced town of Hoosick).  As we entered the hamlet of Buskirk, we took a left to encounter our first covered bridge – the aptly named “Buskirk’s Bridge”, built in 1850 and one of only 29 such bridges in New York.  But what might give it even greater character, is a sign under its name that declares a “$25 fine for driving on this bridge faster than a walk”.

From there, we traveled along River Road, the north side of the Hoosic River, until it intersected back onto Route 67.  This eventually brought us to our destination for lunch; Browns Brewery, at the crossroads of Routes 67 and 22, alongside the Walloomsac River, in North Hoosick.  Nestled underneath a large bridge (currently undergoing expansion), the brewery is in an old valve factory, built alongside a waterfall.  This brick structure is the site of where all Brown’s barreled and bottled beer is produced (http://brownsbrewing.com/walloomsac-taproom/).  Two years ago, this was also the destination of my first HCP D&D, and I’ve been going back several times a year since.  The brewery has expanded with a full kitchen with a variety of menu items and no shortage of beers to sample.

After a relaxing lunch, we set back out on the roads to find more covered bridges.  Getting back onto Route 67, we traveled east toward Bennington, Vermont; passing the famous Bennington Battlefield (located in NY).  Shortly after crossing into Vermont, we turned down Harrington Road, which connected with Murphy Road, the site of our next bridge – “Henry Bridge”; a much smaller single-lane bridge, but in pristine condition.  After crossing the Henry Bridge, we continued on Murphy Road where we encountered “Paper Mill Bridge”.  This bridge leads you into Bennington and connects to Route 67A.  After a short jaunt to the east, we turned onto Silk Road, which led us to the final bridge on the trip – “Silk Bridge”.  Like Henry and Paper Mill, Silk also crosses the Walloomsac River.  It was refurbished in 2000 and, much like the Henry Bridge, is pristine.

After satisfying my curiosity of covered bridges, there was one more Bennington landmark to sort out.  If you’ve ever approached Bennington from a distance, you’ve likely seen an enormous obelisk towering over the city.  That is the Bennington Battle Monument, the tallest structure in the state of Vermont at 306 feet.  It is accompanied by the statue of Seth Warner, a Revolutionary War hero.

After navigating our way around the monument, we traveled into Bennington where we connected with US-7 (not to be confused with Route 7 which leads west to Troy).  We took US-7 south toward the Berkshires, where we then rolled through the Massachusetts town of Williamstown.  This particular stretch of US-7, between Bennington and Williamstown, was well worth the drive, as the vantage point looking down into the various valleys below, was impressive.  From there, we connected to Route 2, which took us through the Taconic Trail State Park and into rural Rensselaer County.  A beautiful drive in its own right; although Route 2 has stretches in need of repair work.

All-in-all, it was 2.5 hours of driving time with a nice hour stopover for lunch to break up the drive.

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Enjoying Rural Schenectady County

By Gary Richards —

Our Porsche is not a daily driver; but, since I hate letting it sit in the driveway for any length of time, I sometimes take it to run errands.  Truth be told, even though I’m in a Boxster S with the top down;   there’s not much excitement driving from Exit 25 to Exit 24 on the Thruway or running down Route 5 in Colonie.  So, the question is, where to go for an enjoyable drive when I don’t have all day and just want to get out for an hour or two?  Here’s a drive I did the other day that answers that question. 

The route is about thirty miles. To reach and drive it from our house in Schenectady takes about an hour and a half.  The actual drive begins and ends at the Pilot Travel Center/Truck Stop on Route 7 in Rotterdam; about a half a mile west of Schalmont High School. For those not driving out of Schenectady on local roads, the Center can be reached via Thruway Exit 25A- Rte. 88.  Take the first exit off I-88 [Becker Road], almost immediately after exiting the toll booths.

The roads which run through rural sections of Schenectady County are lightly traveled and twisting.  Some sections have 40 mph posted speed limits, including Rte. 159 which traces the shoreline of Mariaville Lake. The drive ends with a descent of Kelley Station Road.  It’s one of the best driving roads in the entire area.  Although only a mile long, Kelley Station has more twists and turns than a good detective story.  You need to pay attention when you’re driving this road.  Kelley Station is even more fun going up; so, turn around and do it a couple of times. Although, to do this you’ll need to be a bit creative.  There’s a one lane tunnel at the bottom of the road.  Honk before entering.

If you want to get out for more than an hour or two, make it a drive and dine. The following eateries are within a mile or two of the drive’s start.  They all get pretty good reviews (Canali’s is a classic).

Wagon Train BBQ on Burdeck Street  http://wagontrainbbq.net/

Canali’s Italian on Rte. 159 [Mariaville Rd.] http://www.canalisrestaurant.com/

Armondo’s Villa Tuscan Grill https://www.armondosvtg.com/ and Tops American Grill http://www.tops5corners.com/, both just a few minutes east on Route 7 towards Schenectady.

The link below has a PDF you can download and print to use as your guide:

Rural Schenectady County

 

 

Editor’s note:  Submissions for “Great Drives” are always welcome.  If you’ve recently taken one you’d like to share, feel free to write about it and send along the details of the trip, so other club members might explore the route, too.  You can send your great drive to bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com.

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Chris Pedersen

Chris Pedersen

Number of Porsches owned:  1

Current car:  1999 Boxster

My love for Porsche all started when I was very young.  My parents good friends David and Susan owned a red/orange 1970  Porsche  911.   I think I was around five years old when I fell in love with the simple beauty of the shape. I admired it from a far for several years before I took  my first ride.  Susan picked me up from somewhere in the Porsche.  It was the 70’s so I sat in the front seat unbelted as she drove me home. On the way, we stopped for gas at the full-service station.  I vividly remember watching the gas station attendant fill the tank. I thought it was so cool that they filled it right in front of me. I knew nothing  about the rear engine, the front trunk or the handling and power. It was the sound and the shape that I loved.  It was at that time I set a goal to one day own a Porsche.  Over the years my desire to own one stayed with me. In the late 90s when the Boxster came out I began to prep my wife for the inevitable purchase.  She had owned a VW convertible when we were married and loved the freedom it represented. Every time I saw a Boxster I would say to her “you would look so good in that car.” Nearly forty years after that original ride I was able to make good on my childhood dream of owning a Porsche.  After three months of searching, I purchased my Arctic Silver Metallic 1999 Porsche Boxster in February of 2013.  I immediately became a PCA member and joined the Hudson Champlain Region so I could utilize my car as it was intended. I participate regularly in PCA autocross events and thoroughly enjoy the people I have met and the things I have learned.  I participated in the 48 Hours at the Glenn Driver Education event allowing me to check off another lifelong dream of driving a Porsche on a race track.

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Curt Austin

Curt Austin

Porsches owned:  4

Current cars:  1982 911 SC, 1987 928 S4, 2017 Macan

I had been suppressing my interest in cars for many years, since a 1991 Miata. During a bike ride in 2013, while resting on this bench in Adirondack, NY, I noticed an interesting car parked nearby. I did recognize it as a Porsche, but I had to look closer to find out that it was a Boxster. A “Fundamental Truth” suddenly occurred to me: every guy (or gal) should own a Porsche at least once. Thanks to decades spent in the desert of boring cars, the funds were available.

A month later, I was driving home in a 2009 Cayman S I’d found in California. I’d settled on a car with a roof, without an IMS bearing, and with PDK – as I was lured by the “celebration of engineering” factor. I found only two available, both in SoCal and near my brother. He checked them out, and the white one looked very good. I wired some money, then flew out. A guy from the Cayman forum helped check it out. I took a joy ride up Mount Palomar the next day; wow! The cross-country run (another bucket list item) included stops at Meteor Crater and several relatives, including one budding mechanic. 

The plan was to indulge in this fundamental truth for just two years, then move this pool of indulgence-devoted capital to something else. The two years became four, and the conversion turned into a 1982 911 SC; a swap with a local guy. No, not an even swap. Seems crazy to pay up to get less performance, but the 911 will not be depreciating. I had lost my fear of old cars during these four years, thanks to experience gained with a 1987 928 S4 and a 1959 Austin-Healey “Bugeye” Sprite. In terms of mechanical challenges, a 1980’s 911 is closer to the latter than the former.

These old cars don’t move during the winter, except up and down on a lift or jack stands, so I recently added a Macan to the fleet. 

Ultimately, these Porsches are just machines. Far more significant are the interesting people I’ve met. This is especially rewarding for the older cars, since keeping them going is often a team effort. When, and if, you can manage it, consider saving an old car yourself.  I now think of this as another fundamental truth; everyone should turn a wrench under an old Porsche at least once.

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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July D&D: Roadside attractions in the Catskills

By Bryan Hollenbaugh — 

You simply could not ask for a better day for a Drive & Dine in late July; warm, a bit overcast, and barely a breeze.  That was motivation enough to create our own breeze through the wonders of the Catskill Mountains.  Andy Dorman and Amanda Brinke set the theme of taking the group back in time with a roadside attractions trip to Phoenicia, New York, a little hamlet in the heart of the Catskills.  Phoenicia is the home of the Empire State Railway Museum, as well as the world’s largest Kaleidoscope, located at the nearby Emerson Resort.  Both stops personify the varied history of the region. 

Beginning from the south side of Albany, outside Slingerlands, the group proceeded southward on Route 32 through the villages of Greenville and Cairo, before heading west to make our way across Hunter Mountain.  Using Routes 23A and 214, we made our way through the scenic mountain cuts that eventually brought us to our first destination, the Empire State Railway Museum.

The ESRM is located inside what was once the train depot of the hamlet of Phoenicia, within the western reaches of Ulster County.  The interpretive center is clearly a labor of love for those who volunteer their time refurbishing old engines, railcars and cabooses, placed along pieces of track outside the depot.   These trains have long been replaced by the Amtrak rails that now make their way along the Hudson River at a hurried pace.  But there was a time when the Catskill Mountain rails were the lifeline of supplies and raw materials sent throughout the region.  Today, the ESRM is committed to restoring many of these important relics of days long past.  It appears to be a long, tedious process; but one of forward progress, nonetheless.

The World’s Largest Kaleidoscope, represents a more recent history; combining science, art and a little 1960’s spiritual mysticism that nearby Woodstock has become more synonymous with.  I, for one, didn’t know what to expect from the Kaleidoscope.  I knew it was obviously inspired by the Psychedelic 60s, where science and art collided to spawn the optical overload in a 56-feet-by-38-feet barn silo capable of accommodating up to 20 spectators at a time.  But it did not disappoint and was altogether fascinating.   With a smaller group, you’re encouraged to lie on the floor and stare upwards into the curved ceiling as a light show of color and sound envelop the silo; complete with narration set to rival something out of a Stanley Kubrick film.

As Phoenicia is only 90 minutes south of Albany, this is certainly a day trip you can take on an impulse, without much planning or preparation, as the hamlet is bustling this time of the year with city dwellers looking for clear air, good food and a casual experience.  Plenty of that awaits in the Catskills!

 

(Photos by Amanda Brinke and Bryan Hollenbaugh)

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Gary Richards

Gary Richards

Porsches Owned: 2

Current Car: 2013 Boxster S

A kid’s love affair with cars (I could name every make and model);  an endlessly played 24 Hours of LeMans board game; a late night ride on a country road in an air-cooled, tail-wagging 911:  The seeds of a love affair with Porsches.  They sprouted in 2001 at a retirement dinner for a very good friend.  As my wife and I pulled into the restaurant parking lot, I was puzzled.  There was Charlie, leaning against a new 2001 Guards Red Boxster.  On an English teacher’s salary?  “My retirement present to myself after 32 years of teaching”, he said.  Charlie knew I loved cars.  “ Want to take it for a drive? We have a few minutes before dinner” (Apologies to the guests for taking more than a few).  Standing in the lot, smiling broadly, waiting for us to return, was Joe, our former student. “Like my new car?”, he asked. Duped! After graduating, Joe started his own business- and was doing very well.  Lots of laughs at a great practical joke.  Maybe someday, I told myself…

P.S.  Joe still owns his Boxster- only 10K miles after 16 years. Needs to do some Drive and Dines…

 

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Jeff Meyers

Jeff Meyers

Porsches owned: 2

Current car: 2000 Base Boxster & 2011 Cayenne S

(Excerpts taken from the actual 2008 logbook, when the 2000 Boxster was purchased with 32,500 miles on it)

Scratch me.

I am a generally cautious individual, but I had this itch.  I think through decisions thoroughly, and only make a purchase, such as a car, after a lot of soul searching and general angst, but that itch, it had to be scratched.  Which is why I am both surprised, and relieved, that I just left my motorcycle at a friend’s house in Burlington, Vermont, and am now driving home in my new-to-me Rainforest Green Porsche Boxster.  And I can’t wipe that smile off of my face.

At the getting-to-be ripe age of 41, I have only owned four cars in my life (well, five now).  

When I was eight, my Dad’s friend pulled up in his Porsche 911.  I can still see the wraparound rear window reflector with P-O-R-S-C-H-E spaced almost all the way across the back.  I could get me one of them!  But, alas, my Mom was tolerant of some things, but a mess in her garage forcing her car outside was never going to fly, so I back-burnered my need for a pure sports car for 25 years.  That itch had a long time to fester.  I kept two lists of the cars that I wanted, in order of preference. 

One list was the “one car solution.”  The most recent version of the list had one car – the Audi TT.  The TT drove much more like a sports car, but it wasn’t that much different from the A4.  This, of course, opened up the entire universe of options to me. 

Which brings me to my second list, the “two car solution.”  It was a pretty short list, and three were Porsches.  The Cayman, an older 911, or a Boxster.  Also included were a Corvette, a BMW Z3 or Z4, and finally, the Miata.  I drove a 1993 Miata with 115,000 miles on the clock.  I knew in the first ¼ mile that this wasn’t going to sufficiently scratch the itch.  My wife loved the idea of a convertible after riding in that Miata with me, so this was getting easier.  Corvettes are great, but I had managed to satisfy the need for big horses and massive acceleration by owning several high velocity Superbikes over the years, including a 2001 Suzuki Hayabusa.  BMWs are sweet, but I had re-connected with that inner eight year old, and I didn’t want a BMW when I was back then.  I was beginning to realize that this had larger implications – I was on a mission to find a car that would be fueled by the gasoline in my veins that had been coursing since childhood.  Caymans are gorgeous, but finding a used one within financial striking distance did not seem likely.  And that classic 911 would be a hoot, but I don’t have time now to restore an old car, and don’t know enough about those air-cooled wonders to feel comfortable diving into what could be a slow but sure downward financial spiral. 

Thankfully, I soon after spied that Rainforest Green Boxster on eBay at a Porsche dealer, on consignment by a friend of the owner.  It looked super clean in the photos. And now I am driving it.  Itch scratched.  Sweet.

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? John Eaton

John Eaton

Porsches owned: 1

Current car: 2001 Base Boxster

I was stationed in Germany for three years during the late sixties.  There was a Major who would drive his silver 911 on the flight line; block the wheels ( that was a reg); inspect his F4, then drive off before his flight time. This went on two or three times a week and I was very envious.  I had a BMW, but it just was not the same.  I also had a German friend who ran a car lot.  He would let me drive anything on the lot;  Porsche was the first pick.  Drove 911’s, 914-6 and others.  The hook was set.  Now 40 years later I finally have a Porsche.  Just a used ‘01 Boxster, but a Porsche none the less.  Enjoying the hell out of it!

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Allen Schwartz

Allen Schwartz

Porsches owned: 1

Current car: 2005 Base Boxster

In the spring of 2014, my health was rapidly deteriorating from a chronic health condition; when I was 28, I contracted a dangerous virus while caring for a patient in a hospital. I was now 66, and my condition was worsening each month.  I needed a medical miracle, but at my age, it was unlikely that one would materialize. So I decided to activate my bucket list!  I’d always admired Porsches, but I had been too busy with my career and family to indulge. Yet it was now or never. With the help of my German auto mechanic (he’d been caring for my 2007 BMW for years), we found a mint all black Boxster that seemed perfect.  Once he helped me get over my IMS epic fail worries and had checked it stem to stern, I bought it with his blessings on July 4th!  At the time, I knew nothing about PCA, Autocross, or DE, and just imagined I’d be taking pastoral drives with my wife, top down, breathing in the life I had remaining.  Well, I joined HCP simply to learn about my car, and soon my new club friends had me doing AX, and then DE; by that October, I was driving laps at Watkins Glen!  As my condition became critical, an unexpected opportunity presented itself the next spring that allowed doctors to perform a life-saving procedure. It reversed my condition, and I was cured! By the fall of 2015 I was healthier than I had been in a decade. Now I’m deeply appreciating my new relationships and driving passion, and continuing to learn about my car and myself.  Sometimes I fantasize about upgrading in a few years.  But I have my reservations—my beautiful 2005 Boxster was my salvation, and it could never be truly replaced!

 

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll post for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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July D&D – “Must See Attractions” in the Catskills

Mark your calendar for Saturday, July 22nd, as Andy Dorman & Amanda Brinke have planned a great route for our upcoming July drive.  You’re invited to relive a 1950’s road trip, complete with roadside attractions!  We will meet at the Price Chopper parking lot in Slingerlands at the intersection Route 85 and New Scotland Avenue at 8:30 am on Saturday, July 22nd.  After leaving there at 9 am, we’ll proceed south on a leisurely ride through the rolling countryside of Albany and Greene counties and then into the historic Catskill Mountains.  After climbing up and over several scenic mountain passes, the first stop will be the Empire State Railroad Museum (http://www.esrm.com/).  From here we will head to lunch — keeping with the theme of the day — at the Phoenicia Diner (http://www.phoeniciadiner.com).  Following lunch, and assuming all the kids eat their coleslaw, we’ll head down the road and see the world’s Largest Kaleidoscope (http://emersonresort.com/worlds-largest-kaleidoscope).  Although this particular roadside treat is a product of the 60’s it seems perfect for a 50’s must-stop attraction.  For more information, or to RSVP, you can shoot Andy an email:  andrewgdorman@gmail.com.

 

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HCP Member Lands PCA’s Photo of the Week

HCP’s Eric Spooner’s photo has been selected as PCA’s Photo of the Week in the June 27th e-Brake News.  Below is taken from the e-Brake News.  You’ll be able to vote for your favorite photo in the last newsletter of the month.

 

 

Porsche of the Week
Photo by Eric Spooner. Hudson Champlain Region. “This photo was taken last Fall at the Fox Creek Covered Bridge, in Schoharie, NY. My wife and I were out for a country drive in my 2002 Boxster S when we ran across this old bridge that we had not noticed before.”
 
Got a stunning shot you want to share? Submit your pictures to potw@pca.org. Be sure to include your contact information, your region name, and a few sentences about your picture.
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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Todd Fischer

Here’s another great submission to share for our new segment…

 

Todd Fischer

Porsches owned:  Too many to recall!

Current cars:  Four.  A 1959 356 Convertible D (one of only 1330); 1970 914/6 (one of only 3332);  2004 550 addition 986 Boxster S (one of only 1953) and a 2004 Cayenne S (one of the many!)

It was 1969 in Bayreuth, West Germany.  I had just returned from a stint in the Air Cav Squadron of the 11th Armored Cav in Vietnam.  I had saved most of my pay there and decided, while I was between tours, to reward myself with something other than the Mustang at the next assignment.  It had to be Teutonic since I would be driving those lovely roads in my Father’s land (he was born in Germany).  I ordered the 911 just the way I wanted it and with the exterior color of Irish Green.  That was probably August of ’69.  About a month later, I got a call from the Officer’s Club that one Norbert Singer was there to see me from the Porsche Groβhandler, in Nuremberg.  He asked how long I was to be in Germany.  When I told him about 3 years he told me that I would need to be seen on the Autobahn and the order was promptly changed to Tangerine.  I took delivery 9 months later at the factory with my “baby”.  And yes, I hardly had to flash my lights…the slower cars got out of the way when they saw that red-orange ball coming.

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share the story of why you purchased your first Porsche, feel free to jot those down in 150 words or less and send me an email to me at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com.  Photos are welcome, too!

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Adam Wright

It didn’t take long to receive our first submission.  Adam Wright shares his story of how he came to own his first Porsche:

Adam Wright

Porsches owned:  Too many to recall an exact number

Current cars: Six.  1960 B Roadster; 1995 993; 1958 A Coupe (won Daytona in ’66-67); 1971 914; currently building a 904 (based on an IMSA 914/6); and an aluminum 550 Spyder (based on a C Coupe chassis).  The fun never stops!

“Because I got a check in the mail.  It was a loan check.  I was 19 and my brother and I went Porsche shopping.  He was going to keep the car; changed his mind, so I got it… a 1975 911S. I was hooked.”

 

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll try to post a couple of these each week, for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

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Why did you buy your first Porsche? Bryan Hollenbaugh

At the picnic, fellow HCP member Allen Schwartz mentioned a segment idea he had for the blog.  Essentially, it was about “Why did you buy your first Porsche?” As every one of us has a story about what may have compelled us to acquire our first, I thought it would be fun and encourage participation from our members.  

Some of you may still be enjoying your first Porsche; a few more of you may have moved on to owning several versions over the years, and a few of you have reached a point where you’re jockeying several at one time.  Whatever it may be, one thing is for certain… it all began with your very first Porsche.  So please share your story, as I think we’d all enjoy the story behind the decision.

I’ll be the guinea pig and give an example of the preferred format using my own story:

Bryan Hollenbaugh

Porsches owned: 2 

Current car: 2014 Boxster S

As someone born and raised in Michigan, with a father who spent his entire career in the auto industry, you can imagine why it took me into my 40’s before buying my first Porsche.  Having loyally driven Detroit-designed muscle cars most of my life (among them a ’69 Chevelle, ’05 Mustang, and an ’07 Corvette), there was overcoming “that” obstacle.  However, after living abroad a number of years, I began to truly admire the Porsche lineage.  Knowing I wanted a convertible, a Boxster looked particularly intriguing.  For some, it’s about price point; others its features; many more, it’s about performance.   For me, all of those were considerations; but the biggest question needing to be answered… could I fit in it comfortably?!  The answer was obviously yes, and I bought a used 2000 Boxster shortly after moving back to the States in 2010.  

 

 

Editor’s note:  If you’d like to share your story, send it over to me in 150 words (or less) at bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com and I’ll try to post a couple of these each week, for as long as they roll in.  If you’ve got a photo of your first, by all means, do share!

 

 

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Fun-filled June Autocross

Fifteen drivers took advantage of our second Autocross of the year.  This time around, the event was held at the McCarty Avenue parking area, on the south side of Albany.  Neither heat or humidity would stop drivers from having fun throughout the morning and afternoon sessions, as they took numerous turns around the cone-lined course.  Results are in the link below:

Autocross 06_18_2017

Special thanks to those who helped set up the course and administered the runs.  The next Autocross will be Sunday, September 10th, at McCarty Avenue, and the final one of the season is slated for Sunday, October 8th, in Saratoga Springs.  For more information, contact Autocross Chair Matt Rutten at hcpautocross@gmail.com.

(Photos provided by Will Waldron, Matt Rutten and Bryan Hollenbaugh)

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Camp 928 invades Adirondacks

By Bryan Hollenbaugh —

Anytime there’s a group of Porsche owners and their cars, there are always a couple of models that stick out among the masses.   Whether it be a newly-acquired creation straight off the showroom floor to the classic 60’s era 356; or even a popular production model with one of Porsche’s more noticeable paint schemes; something always manages to catch our eye.  With its long, pointy nose, rotating headlights, and wide array of color variations, the 928 — unofficially nicknamed the “Landshark” — is one such eye-catching model. 

Porsche’s original intention of the 928 was to replace the 911 with a luxury grand touring car; combining power and poise.  A sports car with refinement and comfort; equipped with a front-mounted V8 engine.  Over a span of 18 years (1978-95), the 928 created a loyal fan base from within the expanding Porsche community.   And, in recent news, Bloomberg has formally declared the Porsche 928 an appreciating asset.

Over the weekend (June 16-18), fellow HCP member Curt Austin, who owns a 928 (along with a 911), hosted “Camp 928”; an event focused on the 928 and its owners.  The casual affair drew Landshark owners from across the Northeast, as well as up from Pennsylvania and across the border from Canada; converging on the village of Chestertown, NY, for various fun runs and chatter about the unique experience of owning these cars.  There were 19 registered Porsche 928 owners who participated throughout the weekend.  By the end of Saturday’s various runs through the Adirondacks and around the pristine lakes that dot the Chestertown region, car owners converged on the grounds of the Town of Chester public offices for a public concourse.  A few HCP members also dropped by to share in the conversation and to look under the hood of these amazing cars; many whose engines were kept in immaculate condition.  By all accounts, the event was a major success.  Kudos to Curt for hosting and inviting HCP members to partake.

Editor’s note:  The Chestertown area (Exit 25 off the I-87 Northway) offers many great options to drive.  With Brant Lake to the east; Loon Lake and Friends Lake just west; and Schroon Lake to the north, there is no shortage of water to drive around and the joys of curves that come with it.  And, from a personal note, whether you’re taking a day trip or opting to spend the night (as we did), dinner at the Friends Lake Inn is an equally enjoyable experience. 

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A perfect day for a picnic

You could not have asked for a better day for the annual HCP picnic, held June 11,  at Saratoga Spa State Park.  With 58 cars shined and ready to be shown off, this was perhaps one of the most well-attended picnics in recent years.   

Thanks to all who attended and took the opportunity to mingle and enjoy the barbecue provided by Shane’s Rib Shack.  A special thanks to those who volunteered to pull the event together.  By the end of the afternoon, we had also collected $600 in member donations for the Northeast Regional Food Bank and another $350 in donations to Guiding Eyes for the Blind.

And, finally, thanks to Will Waldron, Gary Richards and Ken Blass for providing photos.

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Driving the Cabot Trail

By Bryan Hollenbaugh —

We’re fresh off a 2,600-mile adventure through some of the Maritime Provinces of Canada; exploring New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.   And, as you might imagine, there are a dozen pieces I could write from our excursion. 

I thought about writing a piece professing my gratitude to the engineers of the Trans-Canada Highways through New Brunswick (especially Route 1 from the US border to Saint John, where the 110 Kilometer Per Hour signs were mentally replaced by miles per hour).  But I nixed that idea as it might be a little too incriminating.  I’ll just say this… those straightaways on perfectly paved roads permitted me to ensure my speedometer was fully functional.  And — perhaps more importantly — not a single RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) was seen the entire trip through Canada (the polar opposite of I-95 through Maine).  But, since I was in Canada, I rationalized that if (by chance) I were pulled over, surely the Mountie would understand my objective, as we’d have been two of the very few people driving via Route 1 that afternoon!

So, instead of writing that piece of my disinterest in abiding recommended speed limits, I thought I might share the exhilaration of driving The Cabot Trail, a 185-mile coastal experience in the Cape Breton Highlands of Nova Scotia.  Everything about Cape Breton Island has a direct correlation to Scotland and Ireland; native home to many of the families who settled the region, including none other than Scottish-born Alexander Graham Bell.  Many of the road signs on Cape Breton are in both English and Gaelic, and most of the live entertainment steers itself toward Celtic folk.  But perhaps the most notable comparison would be the geography; with its thick inland forests; windswept rocky shorelines; abundance of sheer cliffs, countered by low-lying beaches, inlets and fishing ports — it is as close to a replica of the Scottish Highlands as you might find anywhere in the world.  I suspect it explains the allure of settling forefathers (For those who still might not have quite the visual — but have experienced the Pacific Coast Highway along Big Sur – just add far more curves into the drive).

Being that we were there nearly a month before the tourist season begins, it felt as if The Cabot Trail were set aside for our personal enjoyment.  Apart from a pair of Mustang owners from Quebec; the twists, turns, and elevated hairpin curves were virtually ours to explore at our own pace.  Using Baddeck, a little village on Lake Bras d’Or, as our starting point, we set out on the trek; electing to go counterclockwise (giving my wife the best view of the water, of course).   From the beginning, it was simply amazing.  For the driver, you felt the suspension of the car doing what it was designed to do; an easy flow from left to right, without incurring much gravitational pull or stress.  For my passenger, it was surely scenic, but I suspect a little harrowing at times, as I, for one, didn’t recall many road signs “advising”  limits. 

One moment you’d be stepping out to take a photo along an inlet or cove, and the next you’d be 1,200 feet above sea level, looking back for a snapshot of the breathtaking view of the winding road you just conquered.

However, there were a couple of drawbacks in this endeavor; particularly spots of road construction.  Most weren’t too bad, and it appeared as if we were likely the first Porsche spotting of the year for the road crews, as there was always a bit of chatter, waves, and signs of approval as we passed.  I suspect by the time season begins at the end of this month, those major projects will be nearly completed.

Throughout the drive, you enter and exit the Highlands National Park, a massive region that encompasses much of the northern tier of the island.  And, each time we entered the park, the road changes were immediately noticeable.  The park roads were nearly the quality of the Trans-Canada Highway previously enjoyed.  Along the trek, we took a diversion and went out to the northernmost point of the island; a little fishing village, called Bay Saint Lawrence.  Quaint and quiet, it featured little more than a small harbor with fishing boats; a credit union in a shack that only opened for a brief period each day, and a lunch wagon.  

We backtracked from our little diversion and continued our counterclockwise trek around the tip and settled on lunch in an Arcadian fishing village, called Cheticamp; located on the west side of The Cabot Trail.  Despite much of the region being of Scottish and Irish descent, there are a few Arcadian holdovers with villages where French is the prevailing language, of which Cheticamp is one of the more developed ones.

All I can say is this, if you’re looking for a getaway with clean air, very little hustle and bustle, and one of the most picturesque drives you’ll find north of the border; take a couple days to explore Cape Breton Island; and, if you do, definitely make it a point to drive The Cabot Trail.

Editor’s note:  As Canada is celebrating it’s 150 year anniversary, all Canadian National Parks have waved visitor fees this year.  It makes for a great incentive to explore; whether it be Ontario, Quebec, or the Maritime Provinces.

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New gadgets from a rearview perspective

 By Gary Richards —

A nice treat are the Cars & Coffee hosted by Porsche of Clifton Park; but as more than one club member can tell you, these gatherings can get expensive.  It was at such an event, in March 2016, that we saw the 2013 Boxster S we’re now driving.  Less than a week later, it was in our driveway.

It’s a wonderful car — with one notable exception.  With its high seat backs and enveloping cockpit, rear visibility is woefully inadequate. Since many Club members back into parking spaces, we decided we needed to do something about the view aft if we were going to adopt the Porsche parking ritual.  If we only had a backup camera.

I began a search, hoping to find a camera that could be wired to the nav display in our car’s PCM unit.  Most local installers work with a company called NAV-TV, so I gave them a call. Turns out they offer a couple of options for Boxster owners.  One is a unit that’s relatively easy to install, but not suitable for all Boxsters.  Mount a camera, connect it to NAV-TV’s device, make the connection to the PCM unit and you’re good to go.  Anyone with a modicum of mechanical savvy (count me out) could probably do the job.  The other option is for experts only, as NAV-TV recommends pulling the PCM module and shipping it to them for modification. Big bucks here.  Unfortunately, even though our cars a ’13, our PCM unit was one generation too old for either of the NAV-TV options. 

So, on to Google Chrome I went.

A few of hours of plugging search terms into the browser turned up the only possible solution; a rearview mirror that could display an image from a backup camera.  Sounded good but there were flies in this ointment as well as the installation process became much more complicated and it was uncertain we could find a mirror that would be compatible with the mount in our car.  What’s worse, most of the mirrors on the market would look better in a semi than in a Porsche.

Finally, working a great tech guy at Boyo [Vision Tech America], we found our mirror; a unit called the Carkuda.  It’s reasonably stylish but its appeal goes beyond aesthetics.  The mirror is actually an Android device with built-in navigation and the ability to runs apps such as Waze when paired to a phone acting as a Wi-Fi hotspot.   Not sure we’ll set the mirror up this way; but, we’ll certainly use its built-in camera that can record drives in 1080 resolution.  Our mirror is connected to a small, virtually invisible rear lip mounted camera that provides a backup image with guidelines. Installing this myself was out of the question and I didn’t have full confidence in some of the audio/video installers I talked with during my research, so I gave the guys at R&D Automotive a call.  They sent me where they’ve sent a number of other customers — Tint World on Central Ave, in Albany.  After a five-hour installation, the camera and mirror were in and working well.

I tried the recorder for the first time the other day.  If you have ten minutes to kill, the video of a drive up and down the ridgeline that runs from Scotia to Amsterdam on the northern side of the river has been posted immediately below:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ov9bz5TW-9o&t=36s

The roads, Johnson and Waters, are two of the most challenging driving roads in the area (They’re included in the Glenville Hills-Charlton drives that can be found on the blog under Great Drives).  It’s my first attempt with the camera and there are some bugs to work out.  The top was down so there’s glare along with wind noise.  But the video gives some idea of how interesting these roads are.  I will say, though, with their numerous turns and elevation changes Johnson and Waters look far more challenging when you’re behind the wheel than when watching a video of the drive.  Waters is particularly dicey.  The road is narrow in spots and many of the curves are sharp with limited visibility of on-coming traffic.  With the exception of a couple of rough spots on Waters, the road surfaces are good.  There are no posted speed limits but there are homes along the roads, particularly on Waters, so I kept my speed down.

The final verdict on all of this; rear visibility in our car still could be better; but the camera and mirror make a big difference. The time, effort and expense involved were worth it.  Look for us backing up at the next Club event!

 

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Jim Taylor’s Garage: A sensory overload

By Gary Richards

Sensory Overload [Sen-suh-ree oh-ver-lohd]. Noun

1) A condition in which one or more of the body’s senses experiences over-stimulation from the environment;

2) Jim Taylor’s Garage!

It’s a 30,000-foot warehouse located just outside of Gloversville, NY.  You enter through a somewhat cluttered office, past a desk piled high with papers.  Once inside, what you see is a mind-boggling collection of over 100 vehicles displayed in a swirling eclectic style punctuated with old gas pumps, trophies, posters, autographed guitars, neon signs and antique jukeboxes.  This is Jim Taylor’s garage. 

As you gaze at the cars (there are over 25 makes represented), it’s hard to know where to begin.  Fortunately, on a recent trip to the garage, organized by the Saratoga Automobile Museum as part of its Spring Auto Show Weekend, Mr. Taylor was on hand to guide a private tour of his collection. 

It seems there’s a story behind every vehicle — many of them written by Mr. Taylor himself.  His vehicles don’t sit gathering dust; he displays them at some of most prestigious concours in the world… and he drives them.  He’s raced from Beijing to Paris in a 1941 Buick.  There was the year spent driving a Ferrari 599 across North America to promote the brand, simultaneously raising money for the Ronald McDonald house.  He’s currently contemplating shipping a Jag replica once owned by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason to the Caribbean for a road rally.   While he’s driven on virtually every continent it’s just as likely you’ll see him pulling into the Auto Museum in Saratoga in one of his cars. 

Mr. Taylor’s collection may not be the world’s largest [that distinction goes to the Sultan of Brunei who owns over 7000 cars, including 452 Ferraris]; but, it includes many rare and one of a kind vehicles.  On the floor, not too far from a couple of Chevy Corvairs, sits an Aston-Martin once owned by Eric Clapton.  There’s the old Ford truck, long ago used for revival meetings, and there’s a very different side of Ford- two GT’s and four Hertz Mustangs built for the execs at Hertz Rental, to mention just a few of the Mustangs in the garage.  Mr. Taylor’s passion seems to be Jaguars; there are close to thirty in the collection.  Of course, there are also a couple of vintage fire trucks, a taxi and popcorn wagon.  There is one vehicle with two wheels — Evel Knievel’s last motorcycle.

Mr. Taylor, the Chairman and C.E.O. of the Taylor Group [boating products, not Golf clubs] located in Gloversville, NY is a local guy with a great commitment to the local community. He sits on a number of boards and was a founding director of the Auto Museum.   The museum was created with an eye on staging a Coucours d’Elegance in the Spa City.  In Mr. Taylor’s words, “Eventually I’d like to get back to the idea of a Saratoga Concours. Amelia Island and Pebble Beach, California are the premier events in the nation, but with our setting, I think we could develop a world-class event as well.”  With Mr. Taylor’s passion for cars and knowing what’s in his garage, that would be quite an event.

 

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May D&D: Lake Placid and The Wild Center

By Bryan Hollenbaugh

The Adirondacks provide the perfect setting for putting the marvels of our cars to the test.  Numerous twists and turns, through boundless crags speckled with short-lived straightaways as you buzz past wild turkeys or an occasional backpacker along the side of the unusually wide, well-paved roads.  Many of these northern tier jaunts are in better shape than the well-traveled highways and interstates in the Capital Region.  With pristine roads like this in the Adirondacks, it’s no wonder you find yourself feeling incredibly comfortable behind the wheel and let the car do most of the work.

The overnight road trip to Lake Placid did not disappoint.  Chiseled peaks, wetlands and pristine mountain lakes plotted our course, with much of the drive being spent on Route 28 through Indian Lake, then northward on 28N through Long Lake (site of our nicknamed “porta-potties of the Adirondack” tour) before merging with Route 30 through Tupper Lake.  From there, we headed along Route 3 through Saranac Lake with NY 86 taking us into Lake Placid and the High Peaks Resort.   

After time spent wandering the Village of Lake Placid, which is nestled along the aptly-named Mirror Lake, the group of 14 met for dinner at the Great Adirondack Steak and Seafood Company.  As many of you know, food and friendship are staples anytime HCP members converge, and it was an opportunity to welcome first-time event participants Kurt and Lauren to the club while sharing other fond memories between club members.

Despite cool, overcast and rainy conditions, the entourage trekked the following day to one the great gems of the region – The Wild Center, in Tupper Lake.  While it’s formal name is the Natural History Museum if the Adirondacks, The Wild Center is a better fit (and probably a better way to entice a younger generation).  I’ll be the first to admit, I really didn’t know what to expect, but after spending four hours on the grounds and in the museum, I could have easily spent another four taking it all in; as it was clearly an interactive experience for all ages.  It combines the best of what nature offers, with both history and science.  Live exhibits, from birds of prey to otters; films that leave a lasting impression of the flora and fauna; and, perhaps the most intriguing, an interactive planetary sphere which shares details on everything from current air traffic across the globe, to various planets and galaxies, and even shared the concentration of Facebook connectivity on every continent.   It was far more than I expected before walking through the front doors.

A special thanks to Louis Dahoda who organized the event; led the drive both days, planned dinner, as well arranged activities at The Wild Center.

Editor’s Note:  A word to the wise when deciding to venture through these parts:  Never assume there’s a gas station just up the street or in the next town down the road.  As you take some of the less traveled roads you may find facilities are up to 50 miles apart.  So, if you’re down to a quarter tank and there’s a gas station nearby, it might be worth the peace of mind to top off and use facilities.  With a full fuel tank and a sense of adventure, you’re bound to enjoy the scenery and roads!

 

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May Autocross Results

 

Here’s a look at the results of the season’s first autocross, held at the Saratoga Performing Arts parking lot on May 7th.

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The Torch is Passed

Mama take this badge from me; I can’t use it anymore.  There’s a new sheriff in town- Bryan Hollenbaugh is now the law in the blogosphere. 

Two years ago I answered the call for someone to fill the vacant position of club newsletter editor.  I looked duty straight in the eye and said, “Howdy Duty.”[Sorry, I’ve been looking for a way to use that for a long time.] I took on the task thinking I’d be reviving, in some way, HCP’s quarterly newsletter.  Instead, I found myself maintaining a blog that made it possible to shatter the limits imposed by a pdf document.  Beyond offering a wealth of searchable and archived written content, our blog, Open Roads, is able to house hundreds of images, display video, and link to sites across the web- on  devices ranging from cell phones to desktop computers.

I’ve put a great deal of time into Open Roads and  I’m deeply grateful to those Club members who have supported my efforts with their contributions. Ultimately, though, the blog could not flourish under my tenure.  Blogs exist in a world which I don’t inhabit.  Each day, Facebook accounts for one out of every five internet page views in the United States; every minute 510,000 comments are posted and 136,000 images are uploaded to the site.  And there’s Twitter- over 500 million tweets a day. [That’s  200 billion a year.]  I won’t dwell on Instagram, Snapchat, Whatsapp or the almost countless other social media platforms that exist. I don’t have an account on any of these sites and I don’t tweet.  Without integration with social media, our blog was destined to wither and die. I’m not the person to oversee that integration.  Bryan is.

Bryan and I have been working on a smooth transition to his blogship- and he’s ready to go.  Less than a day after meeting me over coffee, he put up a great post describing a day of driving through the Adirondacks.  More importantly, as many of you know, he’s linked Open Roads to the unofficial Club Facebook page.  As a result, viewership of the blog has soared.  He emailed me,  that within a day of creating the link, seventy-four people viewed the blog. 

Those of you who have the good fortune to know Bryan know Open Roads is  in exceptionally capable hands.  I’ll help Bryan in every way possible; I urge all of you to support Bryan’s efforts as well.  Send him photos, write about your cars, your trips, your projects, your favorite roads, your time at the track.  Write about your passion for Porsches. One Club member has already answered the call.  Bob Michalek, armed with deep computer knowledge, will help keep things running smoothly.  Among other things, he’ll make sure the blog calendar is up to date and accurate- giving you a place to check on the wealth of activities HCP offers. A sincere thanks to Bob for his interest and willingness to help out; and, of course, thanks to Bryan as well.

Creating Open Roads allowed the Club to reach members in a powerful and unique way.  Judges in 2016’s PCA newsletter competition found it difficult to evaluate our blog because it was so different from what other clubs were doing.  Never-the-less,  one judge wrote, “I feel the need to add a comment about your blog and this score: I think your blog is FANTASTIC. It is difficult to judge in terms of this competition and the elements we are to judge on, and in it not being a cohesive website. Your blog is an amazing, interactive newsletter.  I’m very impressed.” That was the beginning.  Under Bryan’s guidance, with Bob’s help, and with your contributions, Open Roads will set the standard for PCA “newsletters”. 

G. Richards

 

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Nothing to Do… And All Day to Do It

This gallery contains 3 photos.

By Bryan Hollenbaugh One of the by-products of owning a performance car is the sense of restlessness and the insatiable urge to be behind the wheel. So it should come as no surprise when I had a Saturday with nothing … Continue reading

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Club Visits Historic Kingston and the Maritime Museum

“Then came one of the savages that swarn away from us at going up the river with many others, thinking to betray us.  But we perceived their intent and suffered none of them to enter our ship.  Where upon two canoes full of men, with their bows and arrows, shot at us after our stern.  In recompense, whereupon, we discharged six muskets and killed two or three of them.  Then above one hundred of them came to a point of land to shoot as us.”

So wrote Robert Juet, the Half Moon’s first mate, as Henry Hudson’s ship plied its way up the eponymously named river in search of a passage to the Orient.  Hudson didn’t find his passage; but, instead, a majestic river that was to become a lifeline to New York State.  It’s a river of exceptional beauty but mercurial spirit, capable of swings from tranquility to great wrath.  Newspaper accounts from the 1800’s tell of lighthouse keepers rescuing yachtsmen from certain death in storms that raised twenty-three foot waves on the river.

These accounts and others are housed in Kingston’s Hudson River Maritime Museum, the destination of HCP’s April Drive and Dine.  The museum sits on the banks of the Hudson in Kingston’s beautifully renovated River District.  Warm spring weather and blue skies, brunch at the Ole Savannah restaurant and a museum that tells the river’s story offered Club members a much warmer welcome than that received by Hudson and his crew. 

The Mahicans, some of the original inhabitants of the Hudson river valley, called the river “muh-he-kun-ne-tuck” or the river that flows both ways- alluding to the tidal movements that make the Hudson an estuary from Troy south.  While there are larger rivers in the United States, the Hudson remains impressive.  At points, its flow has been measured at five million gallons per second.  Off the cliffs at West Point the river runs 175 feet deep.  At its widest point a swimmer faces a 3.5 mile crawl.

Spend any time in the museum and it becomes clear the river is a treasure.  From its source at Lake Tear of the Clouds in the Adirondack high peaks to its mouth 315 miles south, the Hudson has sustained commerce and offered year-round recreation ranging from Striper fishing to racing ice yachts at fifty miles per hour.  The yachts, alien-looking craft, along with other boats, models and maps, A.V. presentations and displays highlighting activity along the river, and a variety of artifacts and primary source documents, all paint the Hudson’s portrait.

Outside the museum a promenade runs along the Rondout waterfront where the Mathilda, one of the last surviving steam tug boats with its engine still intact, is dry docked.  Moored in the river alongside the Mathilda are reminders of the river’s past and  hopeful visions of the Hudson’s present and future.  A replica* of the Onrust, the oldest decked vessel built in New York, rests stem to stern with the Sloop Clearwater- the 106’ ship conceived by folk singer and activist Pete Seeger as a way to save the river from the toxic stew it had become. Thanks to the Clearwater and its volunteers, the Hudson’s health is recovering; but, a look at Clearwater’s website reveals there is still much to be done.

A thanks to Bryan and Joyce Hollenbaugh for organizing and leading another great drive and dine and for choosing a location that brought Club members in touch with some of the beauty and history of New York State.  Should we also thank Bryan and Joyce for the great weather? We’ll leave to members to decide if they were lucky or have some serious influence.

*The replica was built by volunteers using 17th century Dutch building techniques at the Mabee farm in Rotterdam, NY.  Construction started in 2006.  The ship was launched in 2009 as part of New York’s quadricentennial celebration.

Want more information?

Hudson River Maritime Museum

The Sloop Clearwater

The Onrust

 

 

 

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Reality Check

Thanks to Paul Budlong for passing this along:

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Join the Appalachia Region for Treffen Asheville

The newly formed Appalachia Region, in conjunction with the PCA is sponsoring Treffen Ashville, September 20-24, 2017.  Here’s a link to the Treffen driving series and what looks to be a great event in North Carolina:

 http://treffen.pca.org/

 

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Update: May’s Overnight Drive and Dine to Placid and the Wild Center

 

Good news- all the more reason to consider what should be a great get-away to Lake Placid.  Contrary to info on the Wild Center website, the Wild Walk platform with its views of the Adirondacks will be open to Club members.  Reservations for the trip need to be made by May 5 so don’t hesitate.

May Drive & Dine – Saturday/Sunday May 13 & 14, 2017  

A weekend drive to Lake Placid staying at the High Peaks Resort with a side trip to the Wild Center.

Note: The event was to start at the McDonalds parking lot (Exit 15 of I-87).  The ride will now depart from the Dunkin Donuts lot which is across the street. Meet at 9 AM; leaving at 9:15 AM sharp.  We will head north Saturday morning through the picturesque mountains of the Adirondack Park arriving at the High Peaks Resort midday.  After checking in, there will be plenty of time to have lunch in town and explore the sights and shops before having dinner as a group at the High Peaks Resort ( http://www.highpeaksresort.com ). The following morning, we will have breakfast as a group and head to the Wild Center ( http://www.wildcenter.org/ )  for a great day in nature. 

Members will be responsible for making their own reservation by calling the hotel reservation desk (518-523-4411).  You must state that you are with the Hudson-Champlain Porsche Club to the reservation desk to get the group rate. 

After you have made your reservation, please email Louis Dahoda to let him know that you will be participating in the weekend getaway to Lake Placid ( Louis.dahoda@edwardjones.com ).

We will be staying for one night (Saturday), included in the package will be dinner Saturday and Sunday morning breakfast.  Single rate is $241.18 and double rate is $316.97. (all inclusive of tax)

Reservations must be made no later than May 5th.

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April Drive and Dine: Kingston’s Historic Waterfront-Maritime Museum

 

Our first drive and dine is set! Get ready for a great road trip to the Historic Rondout Waterfront of Kingston, NY, on Sunday, April 23rd.  We will all meet at 9:30 am, at the Panera Bread location, at 241 Route 9W, in Glenmont, NY. [Please note the change in departure location]

We’ll head out shortly after for a 90-minute ride south, into the Hudson Valley. Once we arrive, the plan is to take a tour of the Hudson River Maritime Museum (www.hrmm.org), followed by a Sunday brunch buffet at the Ole Savannah Restaurant next door (www.olesavannah.com).

For those who want to stick around town and continue to explore, there’s also a Trolley museum across the street from where we’ll be parking, as well as several shops and cafes. If a museum isn’t your thing, you can always walk along the Rondout canal boardwalk or wander into the various shops of Old Kingston.

For more information and to confirm you’ll be going, email bryanhollenbaugh@aol.com.

 

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Zone 1 48 Hours at the Glen Registration Open

Registration for the Zone 1 Drivers Education event, (Zone 1 48 Hours at the Glen), at Watkins Glen is now open.  Registration does fill up for Green and Yellow drivers, so it’s important to register early if you want to participate.  (There are already 160 drivers registered as of this morning.)  So if you have any interest in Drivers Education or driving at Watkins Glen International, sign up as soon as you can.

The dates for Beginners and Novice drivers, (Green and Yellow), are Sat/Sun, May 20 – 21.  Intermediate drivers can register for all 3 days if you wish, Fri/Sun, May 19 – 21.  If you volunteered at the Zone 1 Club Race last year, (or previously), and received a gift certificate, you can use it and get $100 of your fees.  After you register, you will mail the certificate to the registrar and he will refund $100 to your credit card.

Registration is done through ClubRegistration.net; here is the link:    https://clubregistration.net/events/roster.cfm?event_id=7928  If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email or call Jim Morgan.

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Zone 1 Concours and Rally Announced For Canton/Dedham Massachusetts

Click the headline for the official event announcement.  Any questions can be addressed to Murray Kane (mskane55@hotmail.com)  (973) 476-9528 or me (jjmc356@ptd.net)  (201) 410-3171.

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How Many of these DE-tails Do You Know?

Well, February was the third warmest on record and March came in like a lamb.  We can only hope the good weather continues. It’s time to get our cars back on the road- and for many of us, back on the track.  With a DE information session scheduled for March 11 and with the first track days on the calendar at the end of this month, we’re rerunning a piece on DE written by track chair, Chris de Graffenried.  Chris’ piece first ran in August of 2015.

Think you know HCP PCA’s High Performance Drivers Education Program?

A Look at DE by

Chris de Graffenried, HCP PCA Track Chair

If you have been to any of the region’s events you have undoubtedly talked with someone or overheard a conversation about our High Performance Driver’s Education (HPDE) program.  What’s not to talk about when you can drive your car onto the same tracks where Paul Newman, P.J. Jones, Mark Donohue, Mario Andretti and Emerson Fittipaldi worked their magic?

 

  • You don’t need to bring your Porsche.

Most people are surprised by this fact.  We only ask that you be a PCA member or affiliate member.  Whether you are more comfortable trying HPDE in your daily driver, or your 356 is in the middle of restoration, any car is eligible to participate.  To maximize visibility and ensure everyone’s safety we do not allow the following types of vehicles: SUV, Van, Pickup, Motorcycle or Crossover.

 

  • It’s not a boy’s club.

Many people’s impressions of HPDE are that it is a boy’s club, but this couldn’t be farther from the truth.  Not only does PCA have many talented women drivers and instructors, but the events are family friendly.  I highly encourage you to bring your significant other, kids, or friends.  Each event offers time at the end of the day for some fun off track activities, whether it is sightseeing in Watkins Glen, or going wine tasting at the vineyards near Lime Rock Park.

 

  • You have access to a DE “Concierge” before and at each of our events.

HCP has a DE Mentor program which is our best way of helping you get on track and make the most of your experience.  Whether you need to know where to stay, what air pressure to run on track or if there are other members caravanning to the event, our mentor program, run by John Shafer is designed to get you information.  Find his contact info on the club’s webpage.

 

  • Your instructor is trained, experienced, and specifically selected for you.

HCP HPDE instructors go through extensive training both in local and national approved training.  They typically have a minimum of 5 years of HPDE driving and often have additional Motorsports experience (such as Autocross, PCA Club Racing, time trialing, or motorcycle racing).  Our Chief Instructor, Andy Dorman and Registrar, Nick Grizey choose a driver whose experience is most fitting to your existing skill set and who is likely familiar with vehicles like your own.

 

  • It’s not as expensive as you think.

To start, all you need is a free day, your tech inspected car, and about $275 bucks (for entry, gas, tolls).  HCP even has a few loaner helmets for new drivers.  However, once you see how much fun HPDE can be, this rule goes out the window.

 

  • Tech Inspections can be had for free.

Your car needs a brief, but comprehensive checkup before it can come on the track.  Many of the club’s supporting businesses offer the tech inspection for free.  Check the details on the club webpage for more information.  Expert tip – use the tech inspection as an opportunity to renew your NYS inspection at or get some maintenance done one of our club’s supporters.

 

  • You can insure your car against collision damage.

Incidents are extremely rare at HPDE events but if you are worried about protecting your car, insurance can be purchased for on track use.  Many regular car insurance companies do not cover use on a racetrack.  Find more information on the national PCA webpage under Driver Education.

 

Now that you are a DE expert, please consider joining us for our DE Class in 2016.   If you have any questions about HCP’s HPDE program please feel free to contact me (track@hcp-pca.com).

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